Book Review: Water and Weather

Water & Weather: From the Flood to Forecasts

By Tom De Rosa and Carolyn Reeves

Water and Weather is a concise thematic unit study supporting a biblical perspective. Tom De Rosa, a creationist and experienced science educator, along with Carolyn Reeves, also a science teacher with a doctorate in science education who is currently writing and providing educational consulting, did a wonderful job on this book’s content. It is written with both the teacher and student in mind. It has twenty investigation chapters along with a glossary of relevant terms. The home school parent and teacher will not find it difficult to organize the content as it is all written out on page five in How To Use This Book. Bloom’s taxonomy of teaching is definitely incorporated into throughout all lessons from defining to evaluating.  Each investigation has the teacher engage the student in actively realizing the information for more than words on a page. In chapter one, students will design their own fossils after learning about how God created the dinosaurs and physically measuring them out on the floor to determine their size. Afterward, they will answer investigation questions to summarize the information.  There are countless numbers of activities that can stem off of these investigations. The authors created some wonderful text and activities that will kick off a multiplicity of ideas to discover. This book has more than the typical water cycle and weather content. I am impressed with the range of content and vivid pictures as well. The book is inexpensive and can be purchased with a matching journal and teachers guide each only for $4.99. You will be pleased with this book.

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This book was sent to me by New Leaf Publishing in exchange for a book review. All opinions expressed are my own.


Book Review: The 21 toughest questions ..

By Alex McFarland

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This is going to sound weird but I really like the feel of this book. Literally, I don’t know what kind of paper they used on the cover but it feels great. I am not a big eBook reader. I love the feel of the pages, cover, and a physical book in my hand. This book was especially comfortable. I don’t think I have ever mentioned the feel of a book in my reviews but there you go! The 21 toughest questions your kids will ask about Christianity and how to answer them confidently is a true help when it is hard to explain with wisdom filled answers. Alex McFarland put a wonderful resource together. As I began reading this book I decided to use it as a devotional for my children. I approached the 21 questions and supporting information as a mini-lesson.  You cannot read it to the child like a straight out devotional but rather plan the conversation out. Being an educator I appreciate the organized manner in which he lays out every topic, with key concepts, supporting scriptures and quotes, incorporated stories, common questions, and fill in the blank conversation starters to help get some interaction going instead of lecturing the questioning party.  He didn’t call the fill-in-the-blank section conversation starters but that is how I used them. He also includes in the” Key Concept” area a simple and quick “Hope-Filled Answer” that allows for a get-to-the-point answer when you need a quick one. This is not a one-time read type of book for parents; I believe it is a resource you can share with your child through all of their growing stages revisiting the answers as they grow in maturity.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher, Tyndale. All
opinions expressed are my own.


Vision Boards

This week we worked on setting long and short-term goals and dreams so we created our own style vision boards!

Vision board on a poster to hang in your room.

Vision board on a sheet of photo paper to create a sturdy copy for a notebook.

Vision board in a file folder to make it more private to carry around and pull out for review whenever possible.


Crayon Art On Canvas!

Students Creating Our First Art Project!

See instructions below!

 

Supplies:

a canvas (we started with 8×10)

hot glue gun

glue stick

hair dryer

crayons (broken or whole)

surface protection like newspaper or plastic (shower curtains are great for covering surfaces then washing off and reusing later)

Step 1: Pick out the colors you want to use and line them up or put them in a creative design.

Step 2: Use the glue gun to glue the design down. I suggest setting it up on the canvas and then removing a few pieces at a time and gluing down back down as you go. If you’re making a straight line glue first and last piece first so crayons won’t roll.

Step 3: Protect your surface with covering, hold the canvas at the angle you want the crayon to drip. If you are doing a special design it is better to melt it in the direction you want it to drip then let it dry before turning it because as you turn the canvas the crayons run in the direction you turn when they are still hot. Play around with settings on the hairdryer so you can control the splatter and the drip/running of the crayons.

TIP: think the colors through, use several of the same color if you want to get a good solid streak going down, using certain colors together make a muddy brown mix.

Step 4: Let dry and hang!