Book Review: Raising Boys By Design

 

By: Gregory L. Jantz PhD and Michael Gurian with Ann McMurray

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This book carries wonderful insight about the way boys think.  As a mother of three girls and only one boy I never realized how different I needed to raise him. Being fair amongst my choices in raising him, I know now does not mean being equal among them all. According to Gregory L. Jantz PhD and Michael Gurian he needs a whole different type of upbringing than the way I raise my girls. I am seriously glad I received the insight because I did not know until I read this book the reason my son could not handle more than one task at a time or why when he was upset he would rather go to his room and think it out alone instead of working it out with someone.

Some of the great features about Raising Boys By Design are that the text contains a timeline for boys from birth to adulthood and their use of technology with do’s and don’ts for each age group, it contains advice about creating technology free rooms, Internet filters and cell phone use. All of the previous prefaced by the effects that “time on the screen” have on his developing brain.

The amount of information on developing boys is so immense that I felt there is too much to grasp in one sitting. Using this book as a reference and revisiting the information is helpful and will be a good idea in taking the information as needed after reading all the way through to get the basics. One particular favorite part of mine was “8 ways to help boys processing emotions.” It went through different tactics to help your boy express themselves safely in physical and verbal ways.

It made a big difference to approach my son in such different ways that appeal to his thought process. We knew what we wanted to have as an end result for his character development and moral standing; therefore this book came in very handy for imparting it in a way to make a better connection with him.

 

I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this unbiased review.


Book Review: The 21 toughest questions ..

By Alex McFarland

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This is going to sound weird but I really like the feel of this book. Literally, I don’t know what kind of paper they used on the cover but it feels great. I am not a big eBook reader. I love the feel of the pages, cover, and a physical book in my hand. This book was especially comfortable. I don’t think I have ever mentioned the feel of a book in my reviews but there you go! The 21 toughest questions your kids will ask about Christianity and how to answer them confidently is a true help when it is hard to explain with wisdom filled answers. Alex McFarland put a wonderful resource together. As I began reading this book I decided to use it as a devotional for my children. I approached the 21 questions and supporting information as a mini-lesson.  You cannot read it to the child like a straight out devotional but rather plan the conversation out. Being an educator I appreciate the organized manner in which he lays out every topic, with key concepts, supporting scriptures and quotes, incorporated stories, common questions, and fill in the blank conversation starters to help get some interaction going instead of lecturing the questioning party.  He didn’t call the fill-in-the-blank section conversation starters but that is how I used them. He also includes in the” Key Concept” area a simple and quick “Hope-Filled Answer” that allows for a get-to-the-point answer when you need a quick one. This is not a one-time read type of book for parents; I believe it is a resource you can share with your child through all of their growing stages revisiting the answers as they grow in maturity.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher, Tyndale. All
opinions expressed are my own.