Book Review: Water and Weather

Water & Weather: From the Flood to Forecasts

By Tom De Rosa and Carolyn Reeves

Water and Weather is a concise thematic unit study supporting a biblical perspective. Tom De Rosa, a creationist and experienced science educator, along with Carolyn Reeves, also a science teacher with a doctorate in science education who is currently writing and providing educational consulting, did a wonderful job on this book’s content. It is written with both the teacher and student in mind. It has twenty investigation chapters along with a glossary of relevant terms. The home school parent and teacher will not find it difficult to organize the content as it is all written out on page five in How To Use This Book. Bloom’s taxonomy of teaching is definitely incorporated into throughout all lessons from defining to evaluating.  Each investigation has the teacher engage the student in actively realizing the information for more than words on a page. In chapter one, students will design their own fossils after learning about how God created the dinosaurs and physically measuring them out on the floor to determine their size. Afterward, they will answer investigation questions to summarize the information.  There are countless numbers of activities that can stem off of these investigations. The authors created some wonderful text and activities that will kick off a multiplicity of ideas to discover. This book has more than the typical water cycle and weather content. I am impressed with the range of content and vivid pictures as well. The book is inexpensive and can be purchased with a matching journal and teachers guide each only for $4.99. You will be pleased with this book.

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This book was sent to me by New Leaf Publishing in exchange for a book review. All opinions expressed are my own.


Book Review: Galápagos Islands

By Dr. Purdom

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A book for all ages, I found this book to be very pleasing. All the pages were thoroughly yet succinctly written by many special contributors. Great names like John C. Whitmore, Todd Charles Wood, Nathaniel Jeanson and many more used profound expertise to share their information in a way that readers may admire God’s creation. The inclusion of material in this text which these biochemists, ecologists, and geologists present brings scriptures to life. This, along with in-depth information about Darwin’s discoveries and how they compare and relate to God’s word are captivating to say the least. The vibrant pictures of wild life in their natural habitats captured the attention of my second grader while the text just added to the amazing pictures for my teens. Another wonderful thing I like about this type of non-fiction book is the wealth of information located in the back of the book. The ability to learn about and be introduced to like-minded individuals, as these scientist and authors, is priceless for anyone who is seeking out more resources in learning about science and God’s creation. The ending includes references, articles, DVDs and websites used within the writings which students can use for more research. You will also find a very inviting presentation encouraging you to look up the book Grand Canyon by Master Books, which seems just as appealing as Galápagos Islands. Definitely a must have for your library.

See the book here on the New Leaf Publishing Master Books webpage.

This book is published by Master Books, a division of New Leaf Publishing Group.


Reader View: There’s something missing in our classrooms – The Santa Fe New Mexican: My View

Reader View: There’s something missing in our classrooms – The Santa Fe New Mexican: My View.


Book Review: A Perfect Pet for Peyton

By Gary Chapman and Rick Osborne

Illustrated by Wilson Williams Jr.

 

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 Well this book just jumped right into it. At first glance, it seems too long to tell this story to a child in one sitting. I was expecting some kind of parental page of instructions in the front that would explain how to break it into a few lessons. I wanted to get some guidance first on how to use it. Needless to say, I am sure it is difficult to summarize the content for a child when you are trying to get a point across as Chapman is about Love Languages. Though a child’s attention span may not get all the way to page 52, I believe that with some creativity you may be able to take it a few pages at a time and finalize the entire book with the quiz at the end that allows a child to express his/her likes. This part does come with instructions on guiding your child so as to not press them to any particular answer and get a good evaluation on their love language. The text was enjoyable reading for me and my children. It included cute fonts that supply the eyes with eye candy while reading it and in my opinion breaks the monotony of regular text. There are plenty of pages of seek and find fun included so that a child can take a break and engage in activity.  Overall, the book expresses love, caring, selflessness and other fantastic character qualities

I was provided this book by Moody Publishers for providing this review. I
was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have
expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the
Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

 


Crayon Art On Canvas!

Students Creating Our First Art Project!

See instructions below!

 

Supplies:

a canvas (we started with 8×10)

hot glue gun

glue stick

hair dryer

crayons (broken or whole)

surface protection like newspaper or plastic (shower curtains are great for covering surfaces then washing off and reusing later)

Step 1: Pick out the colors you want to use and line them up or put them in a creative design.

Step 2: Use the glue gun to glue the design down. I suggest setting it up on the canvas and then removing a few pieces at a time and gluing down back down as you go. If you’re making a straight line glue first and last piece first so crayons won’t roll.

Step 3: Protect your surface with covering, hold the canvas at the angle you want the crayon to drip. If you are doing a special design it is better to melt it in the direction you want it to drip then let it dry before turning it because as you turn the canvas the crayons run in the direction you turn when they are still hot. Play around with settings on the hairdryer so you can control the splatter and the drip/running of the crayons.

TIP: think the colors through, use several of the same color if you want to get a good solid streak going down, using certain colors together make a muddy brown mix.

Step 4: Let dry and hang!


Learning Styles

My personal experience with homeschooling has been ongoing.  I have learned that though they may be broken down further there are three basic learning styles:

  • visual learners- learn through seeing
  • auditory learners- learn through hearing
  • kinesthetic learners-learn through touching, moving, or doing

At first, I was homeschooling my oldest two children until about the age of five and six. My daughter loved it. We invited friends over and they played, sang, and reviewed all the basics, preparing them for school. She absorbed the entire environment. She was mostly visual and kinesthetic. She loves having a perfect spot to sit in, with the perfect tools in her hands.  I set aside a room and turned it into a classroom for fun. She would sit and write, read, and pretty much do anything I introduced her to, always staying on task. My son on the other hand, was an entirely different type of learner. I could not get him to sit still for more than two minutes. He was very active, wouldn’t hold a pencil (his small motor skills were not quite developed yet), he wouldn’t repeat the alphabet and just seemed to be all over the place. Actually, he never really spoke at all. I struggled with trying to make him fit into my mold of what a “perfect little student” was to me. I never forced him to sit as he was younger than everyone else and he just wandered around the room doing what he found interesting and listening to us. One day, I wanted to take a break and I played an educational video that I picked up at the library. It had a catchy little tune as it reviewed the names and sounds of the letters. He whipped his little head around and then instantly sat and listened attentively to the entire video. As soon as it was over it was like everything he had ever heard from my homeschooling the girls just came blurting out in song. He was so extremely and primarily auditory (and secondly kinesthetic) that even though he looked like he was just aimlessly walking around touching stuff, he was absorbing every word, song, and lesson that we were going through. From then on, he had so much to say and do. Over the next few years we practiced his motor skills but leaned on his auditory strength using and making songs out of science vocabulary and history lessons. What kind of learning style does your child have?